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N.Y. county gets help from NYPD after hackers hit 911 center, PD HQ

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  • Joe Kenda
    replied
    Originally posted by Dustoff262 View Post
    Why is it susceptible to cyber attacks? It should be a closed system disconnected from the internet. Call comes in, it gets entered, sent via ethernet to its in house database, sorted to the appropriate dispatcher where its transmitted via radio. I know that the RMPs have laptops and they must have wifi connection to the data base, so it's a weak spot that has to be worked out.

    But other than that, this telecommunications work should be within a closed loop without a backdoor.
    Someone with system access could’ve inadvertently put malware on the system through a compromised computer, etc. The CAD system (even if not connected to the internet) could get infected by a terminal that IS connected and hosts the malware and injects it into the CAD system during routine maintenance, etc. If the CAD system had decent safeguards against the introduction of malware, etc. it probably could’ve been blocked. It comes down to the CAD vendor and the MIS employees working the system to keep cyber security updated and monitored.

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  • Dustoff262
    replied
    Why is it susceptible to cyber attacks? It should be a closed system disconnected from the internet. Call comes in, it gets entered, sent via ethernet to its in house database, sorted to the appropriate dispatcher where its transmitted via radio. I know that the RMPs have laptops and they must have wifi connection to the data base, so it's a weak spot that has to be worked out.

    But other than that, this telecommunications work should be within a closed loop without a backdoor.

    Leave a comment:


  • RetirementIsParole
    replied
    Still no explanation of what NYPD's assistance to Suffolk entails

    Leave a comment:


  • HAPD
    replied
    Originally posted by Joe Kenda View Post
    Some thoughts: First, the "card & belt" system was what the NYPD used before SPRINT came into existence in 1968. Jobs were hand-written on color-coded cards (different colors to delineate the boroughs) and placed on matching colored "belts" which went to the appropriate dispatcher. When the belts were down, they used runners to hand-deliver the jobs to the dispatcher. A slow and sometimes dysfunctional method but was the only choice pre-1968 or post 1968 when SPRINT went down.

    My question here regarding this cyber-attack is directed at the CAD system installer - what kind of security was (or was not) installed to thwart hacking attempts and who was monitoring the system to keep it updated and safe? Many questions to be answered to allow something as sensitive as the 9-1-1 CAD system to be hacked and attacked. Inquiring minds want to know . . . . . . . . . . 🤨
    Likely lowest bidder of politically connected.

    Leave a comment:


  • Joe Kenda
    replied
    Some thoughts: First, the "card & belt" system was what the NYPD used before SPRINT came into existence in 1968. Jobs were hand-written on color-coded cards (different colors to delineate the boroughs) and placed on matching colored "belts" which went to the appropriate dispatcher. When the belts were down, they used runners to hand-deliver the jobs to the dispatcher. A slow and sometimes dysfunctional method but was the only choice pre-1968 or post 1968 when SPRINT went down.

    My question here regarding this cyber-attack is directed at the CAD system installer - what kind of security was (or was not) installed to thwart hacking attempts and who was monitoring the system to keep it updated and safe? Many questions to be answered to allow something as sensitive as the 9-1-1 CAD system to be hacked and attacked. Inquiring minds want to know . . . . . . . . . . 🤨

    Leave a comment:


  • 509thSFS
    replied
    I have a family member who works out there. It's rumored County Executive Steve Bellone (US Army veteran) said he would rather spend $2.3 million on new computer systems than pay the hackers one dollar.

    Leave a comment:


  • 509thSFS
    replied
    Calls are going through to 911, they're written on paper cards, and given to a "runner" who brings them to a dispatcher who is on another side of the floor. Prisoners are driven to trooper barracks for fingerprinting, then back to a precinct for processing. I heard (possibly) the police weren't targeted. Just the county government, but to prevent further spread of the virus...everything has been shut down.

    The 911 personnel don't get paid much, they get mandated to work overtime, and have few promotional opportunities. They work in the same dark building without sunlight and deal with a-holes. If I ask could you work OT Tuesday, you will have plenty of time to arrange cars, sleep, school for kids, meals, etc. Most of the 911's staff get mandated at the last minute. We owe them lots.

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  • RetirementIsParole
    replied
    What exactly is being accomplished- are Suffolk's 911 calls being forwarded to us and we relaying the requests back by phone? Are we performing their DMV/NYSPIN/NCIC checks by phone from them and reporting back the responses?

    Leave a comment:


  • N.Y. county gets help from NYPD after hackers hit 911 center, PD HQ

    Police One-N.Y. county gets help from NYPD after hackers hit 911 center, PD HQ
    Dispatchers have resorted to using pen and paper, while officers must use encrypted radio while on patrol
    42 minutes ago By Amanda Spence
    SUFFOLK COUNTY, N.Y. — Almost two weeks ago, Suffolk County, New York, was struck by a cyberattack that targeted many of the county’s computer systems – including the 911 call center and police department. Officials are now asking for the NYPD’s assistance as the county’s 911 call center and police force continue to deal with the aftermath.
    According to NBC 4 New York, the dispatch center has been seriously affected and employees have resorted to using pen and paper to get their jobs done since many computers remain out of commission.
    “Unfortunately had to go back to our old system where information is recorded by hand and information is handed to the dispatcher, in contrast to putting it into a computer-aided system,” Suffolk County Police Commissioner Rodney Harrison explained.
    The NYPD is providing assistance with five call operators per shift to help with incoming calls. But it isn’t just the dispatch center that was affected. Law enforcement officers can’t use their computers located in their vehicles to do perform tasks like background checks. They now have to use encrypted radio to get in touch with state police or highway patrol for critical information.
    Since the hack, those claiming responsibility have put up information on the dark web with threats of posting documents they got ahold of until the county pays a ransom.
    Harrison said the county is diligently working to get the dispatch center back up and running – a task they hope to accomplish by Friday.​
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